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Schools for the Deaf

Read this section to learn if a school for the deaf is right for your child.

What a school for the deaf is
Two boys doing a presentation.
Schools for the deaf are schools where:

  • All students are deaf or hard of hearing.
  • Lessons are made just for students with hearing loss.
  • Teachers and staff are trained to work with children with hearing loss.

What kinds of schools for the deaf there are
There are two main types of schools:

  • Residential schools.
    • Students live on campus with other children with hearing loss.
    • Students live at school during the week, and go home on weekends and holidays.
    • Students eat at school.
    • Students may have their own bedrooms or share with other students.
    • Adults live with the children to watch over them.
      The adults may help them play, do their homework or join after-school activities.
  • Day schools.
    • Students go to school with other children with hearing loss.
    • Students go to school during the day. They go home every afternoon.

Different schools also communicate with students in different ways. Read our communication choices section to find out what these ways are.

How you can choose a school

The type of school you choose depends on certain things:

  • What schools there are where you live
  • How your child communicates
  • How good the program is
  • Your own personal choices

How going to a school for the deaf may affect your child

  • Your child will be around many other children with hearing loss.
  • Your child can find role models in older deaf children, and deaf teachers and staff.
  • Your child may learn more about Deaf culture than in a mainstream school.
drawing of a house

Find a deaf school for your child

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NIDCD

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
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